Archive for the 'Baking' Category

The making of apple pie

October 18th, 2014

I love pie, but I really don’t make it enough. The problem is the amount of food. My husband and I shouldn’t eat a whole pie (I almost said “couldn’t” but then I realized that wasn’t true), and it’s also not enough to share with my coworkers (I double my cookie and cake/cupcake recipes for work). Having people over is pretty much the perfect time.

This morning when we went to do yard work, we saw that apples had grown inĀ on our apple tree! Today also happens to be when we’re hosting a football watching party, so it was the perfect time to make some apple pie :) This is a recipe my mom has been using for several years, with a few modifications by me.

The first thing I make is the dough because it needs to be refrigerated for at least an hour before it’s used. Homemade dough may seem intimidating, but it’s actually quite easy and uses very little ingredients.

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When it comes to cookies, cakes, and frosting, you usually start with room temperature butter because it allows more air to be beaten in. For pies and tarts, you typically use cold butter, and it’s easier to use when cut into smaller pieces and slowly added into the mix. My mom does this part by hand, but I like using my stand mixer with a flat beater. (A large food processor would work as well.)

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Scalloped cake edges

February 13th, 2014

First, I have a small site update! I added a new category called “Tips/Recommends” with 3 subcategories: Baking, Gaming, and Photography. I want to continue writing helpful articles once in a while and wanted an easy way for people to find them again :)

And so, I have another baking tutorial today! I really like doing scalloped cake edges right now. They’re simple, yet have that “wow” factor that make people think it’s hard or time consuming to do. Hopefully with this tutorial, you’ll see that it’s actually fairly easy.

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1. You’ll need: a cake, frosting, icing spatula, and a pastry bag. Optionally, you can also use a large round frosting tip. If I had one, I’d use it, but all of my large tips are star or flower shaped =/

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2. Start by crumbcoating the cake. I’ve mentioned it before, but crumbcoating is where you put a thin layer of frosting on your cake, and then you refrigerate it for about an hour. Afterwards, the frosting becomes a solid layer with the crumbs trapped inside. This gives you a clean surface to work off of.

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Cake decorating tips

June 15th, 2013

Cake decorating is a hobby that I do on and off. (See my works.) It came about after I watched way too many cake shows on TV, and I just kind of taught myself over the years. Though I show off my fondant ones, I actually use frosting a lot too. Here are a few tips on getting pretty cakes with frosting instead of fondant :)

1. Crumbcoat
I always crumbcoat my cakes, whether I use fondant or frosting. A crumbcoat is a thin layer of frosting that traps in the loose crumbs. After your cake is fully cooled, apply a thin and smooth layer of frosting, then refrigerate for about an hour.

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What does this do? First, the crumbcoat seals in the cake’s moisture. Second, after you take it out of the fridge, you’ll notice it turns into a solid layer with the loose crumbs stuck in it. It gives you a smooth surface to do the rest of your frosting.

2. Homemade frosting
Not only does homemade frosting taste a billion times better than any store-bought frosting I’ve ever tried, but I also find it easier to spread. Need a recipe? I recommend this one.

3. Icing spatula
If you don’t have a long, flat icing spatula, I would definitely get one! They are great for getting a smooth look. You can find different sized ones in the cake aisle at craft stores.

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4. Pile on the frosting
I like to put a bunch of frosting on the cake before I start smoothing it out. I find this easier to do than just putting a little on at a time. A thicker layer of frosting will also be easier to work with than a thinner one.

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